Let Them Post: Why You Should Allow Your Employees to Use Social Media at Work

Posted by Emily Lange Rodecker on January 24, 2013

You’ve jumped on the “Bring Your Own Device” bandwagon at the office – your employees are accessing company email on their personal devices, working remotely on their own laptops, taking company calls on their cell phones. It’s time to think about how social media fits into the picture. Are you also allowing your employees to “Bring Your Own Social” (BYOS)? Before you cry “Distraction! Information leaks! Inappropriate posts! Oh, the horror!” – remember this: your employees are smart. That’s why you hired them. Not to say that mistakes can’t happen, but Gremlin Social is here to help with ways your employees can BYOS to the business world while still being responsible to your brand.

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Topics: branding, bring your own device, bring your own social, Business, compliance, facebook, gremln, small business, social media, Social Media for Small Business, strategy, twitter business, twitter business tools

4 Ways to Measure Social Media ROI with Gremln

Posted by Clayton Smith on December 14, 2012

Now that 2012 is just about over, I can officially state, with all appropriate certainty, that the social media question I heard the most often this year was, “How do I determine social media ROI?” The main reason returns on social strategies are so important, of course, is that success (or the lack thereof) almost always determines budgets, and every now and then it even determines jobs. Which makes this a very important question indeed.

Some people will tell you that you can’t calculate social media ROI, but I respectfully disagree. Measuring social media ROI isn’t impossible…it just isn’t straightforward.

When you calculate return on a traditional financial investment, there’s a simple, straightforward calculation that allows you to quickly determine your return: ROI = (Gain from Investment – Cost of Investment) / Cost of Investment. The reason this formula is so straightforward is that all the variables are distinct. You know how much money you’ve invested, and you know how much money you’ve gained from that investment. Simple.

The reason social media returns aren’t quite so simple to calculate is because the variables aren’t as clear cut. What, exactly, have you invested? Employee salary? Graphic design costs? Social media software costs? Facebook ad expenditures? Product giveaways? Where do you draw the line between social media resources and everyday business expenses?

And how about that return? Ideally, of course, you’ll see an increase in revenue as a direct result of your social strategies, but that’s not the only type of positive return you can get. What about engagement? Social media is all about building communities of people who, when the time is right, will rally around your product or service…so high levels of engagement are important, aren’t they? And how about brand strength? If you can manage to move your Facebook likers from fans to brand loyalists, what’s the dollar value there? Certainly that’s a positive return. The same goes for customer service. If you use your social media as a customer service tool (and you should), isn’t customer satisfaction a positive return on that investment?

The problem isn’t that social ROI is impossible to calculate; the problem is that there are just too many ways to calculate it. In order to get an accurate return measurement, you’ll need to settle on the type of return you want to measure. Here are four suggestions on getting started, with a little help from Gremln:

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Topics: 101, brand, Business, business, campaign, dashboard, education, facebook, google+, google plus, gremlin, gremln, linkedin, Marketing, media, ROI, small business, social, social media, strategy, twitter

Ditching the Pre-Social Mentality in a Social Marketing World

Posted by Clayton Smith on November 8, 2012

Last week, RAM Racing sponsored the Hot Chocolate 15K/5K race in Chicago. The race was held on Sunday, and the runners were to pick up their race packets on the preceding Friday and Saturday. The race on Sunday came off smoothly; packet pick-up, on the other hand, was something of a disaster.

Due to poor overall organization and a few technological hiccups, the packet pick-up process, which might normally have taken 15 or 20 minutes, took some people over three hours. Three hours of standing in line, out-of-doors, in the famously brisk Chicago wind.

This wait, born of organizational missteps, would not normally be worth mentioning here on the Gremln blog—companies find themselves handling dropped balls all the time. But the irritated runners who were made to wait outside for hours took to Twitter and Facebook to express their anger toward the organizers of the Hot Chocolate race, and RAM’s response, or lack thereof, warrants an examination.

Many runners were quite vocal in their social media anger.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Topics: 101, analytics, brand, Business, business, crm, dashboard, education, facebook, google+, google plus, gremlin, gremln, linkedin, Marketing, media, network, ROI, small business, social, social media, strategy, tips, twitter

7 Steps to Social Media Intern Success

Posted by Clayton Smith on July 17, 2012

A lot of social media advisers will tell you, unequivocally, unabashedly, without hesitation, and without reservation, to never, ever, ever, even in times of great desperation, put your company’s social media into the hands of an intern. The reasons they’re likely to cite for this are many; interns are untrained; interns are unproven; interns are untested; interns have limited experience; interns turn over faster than steaks on a grill. And are you really going to entrust your most accessible and spreadable public voice to a college student who is unfamiliar with your company and, in all likelihood, not even on your payroll?

These are all excellent points, and for many people, they outweigh the distinct benefits of intern social media management (namely, interns are cheap, they’re eager, and they tend to be digital natives). But sometimes, a dedicated social media employee just isn’t an option. Non-profit organizations and smaller companies with extreme budgetary constraints (or even budgetary non-existence) can find it impossible to justify the resources needed to manage an ongoing social media presence.

In other words, sometimes there’s no choice: Hire a social media intern, or forego a social media presence altogether.

Despite the warnings of naysayers, though, utilizing a social media intern doesn’t have to be a doomsday scenario. It just requires a little careful preparation.

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Topics: Business, business, dashboard, education, facebookt, gremlin, gremln, intern, internship, linkedin, management, media, non-profit, organization, ROI, small business, social, social media, strategy, success, team, twitter

Treadmills, Travel Time, and the Value of Analytics: Justifying the cost of social media success

Posted by Clayton Smith on May 22, 2012

Confession time: I pay good money on a monthly gym membership just so I can go and run on a treadmill a few times a week. It drives my wife crazy. Why spend $40 a month, she argues, when I can save money by running outside for free? It’s a reasonable question. After all, I’m sure we could find some great uses for an extra $480 a year, and if all I’m doing at the gym is running, I’m not experiencing any additional workout benefits than I would by running on the sidewalk every day. So yes, it’s a good question. Luckily, I have a good answer.

I’m buying the analytics.

Running on my own, outside, is great, and it’s actually the way I prefer to run. Fresh air, occasional sunshine, near-death experiences involving inattentive drivers; it all makes running outdoors a lot more exciting than jogging in place, staring at a wall. But when I run outside, I’m running blindly, analytically speaking. I can’t pinpoint how far I’ve run, how many calories I’ve burned, how steep my incline is, how fast I’m going, or how high my heart rate is. I don’t have access to any of these metrics when I run on my own, and to me, these analytics are a vital part of my workout routine. Tracking them allows me to see how my workouts are improving and how successful my runs are from a personal health point of view. The numbers help me stay motivated, and they constantly give me new goals to reach. For me, $40 a month is a small price to pay for those stats.

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Topics: analytics, Business, business, campaign, dashboard, facebook, google+, google plus, gremlin, gremln, linkedin, Marketing, media, network, ROI, small business, social, social media, statistics, stats, strategy, twitter

365 Days of Fun

Posted by Clayton Smith on May 7, 2012

Earlier this year, we posted a blog about the importance of having fun with your company’s social media marketing. Since then, quite a few of you have asked us for ideas on how to liven up your social space with a little bit of mirth and merriment. But we thought we’d do you one better. After all, why just tell you how to make social media fun when we can show you instead?

Soon, Gremly will be taking over the Gremln Facebook page and bringing you 365 Days of Fun. That’s right. We’re bringing you one whole year of games, challenges, quizzes, contests, prizes, jokes, riddles, dares, and more, with a new bit of social media levity posted to our Facebook page every day. Gremln’s 365 Days of Fun is going to be so full of fun and ridicularity that we had to make up the word “ridicularity” just to describe it.

There’s just one problem. If you head over to our Facebook page, you’ll notice that Gremly’s all ready to board the Roller Coaster of Fun, but he’s not quite tall enough yet.

That’s where you come in.

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Topics: business, company, facebook, fun, google+, gremlin, gremln, Gremln News, how to, linkedin, Marketing, media, party, plan, ROI, small business, social, strategy, Timeline, tutorial, twitter

Staying Social at the Holidays -- 4 ways Gremln can help keep your marketing message strong over the holiday break

Posted by Clayton Smith on December 20, 2011

We're nearing the end of December, which means that many offices are about to hit Ghost Town status for a week or two. Between holiday time off and the last-minute usage of leftover vacation days that won't carry over into the next year, the time between Christmas and New Year's is a time of relaxation for many people.

This can be tricky for marketing departments, especially in small businesses, because the same surge of vacation time that's allowing marketers to stay home over the holidays is also giving millions of potential customers the chance to spend some quality time browsing around on social media. Many companies have strict policies about social networking, so their employees are likely to experience a little digital release from home over the end-of-year break. With so many potential customers surfing the Web, it's a prime time for marketers to shine. Here are a few ways you can keep your campaigns and promotions running, even if there's no one in the office:

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Topics: Business, business, christmas, education, facebook, gremlin, gremln, holiday, linkedin, Marketing, ROI, small business, social media, tips, twitter

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